Faculty Information & Resources

The community-based learning (CBL) administrators provide support services for faculty members interested in teaching a CBL course. They can provide faculty development one-on-one meetings, workshops, resources to assist in the integration of community engagement into courses, logistical support, guidance on meaningful reflection and help make connections with potential community partners.
  • Best practices in community-based learning
    1. The service is in response to a community-defined need.  This may mean placement at the service location (such as tutoring, serving needy populations, or mentoring at-risk youth), or project based work (such as small business consulting, assistance with grant writing, or creation of advocacy materials).  
    2. The service should be integral to course learning goals, allowing for deeper understanding of the course content through a type of experiential learning. Course credit is earned not by service alone, but by the learning process gained through service. An ongoing (weekly) service commitment has been found to be more beneficial to learning objectives than one single day of service.  
    3. Students critically reflect on their experience through some combination of written course assignments and discussion of the experience and how it relates to the coursework.
    4. Prepare students for working in the community. This includes emailing registered students prior to the start of the semester, including a discussion of expectations on the first day of class and in the syllabus, and an introduction to the partner or service site.
  • How does community-based learning impact students?

    Studies have consistently found that community-based learning / service learning improves:

    • Academic learning, as reported by both students and faculty
    • Learning outcomes, including complexity of understanding, problem analysis, critical thinking and cognitive development
    • Students’ ability to apply what they have learned in the “real world”
    • Retention and graduation rates

    Eyler, J., Giles,D., Jr., Stenson, C., and Gray, C. (2001) At a glance: What we know about the effects of service-learning on college students, faculty, institutions and communities, 1993 – 2000 (3rd Ed.). Learn and Serve America National Service Learning Clearinghouse.

  • What does community-based learning look like at Manhattan College?

    As our fields of study are diverse, so are the community-based learning courses already offered on our campus.  Some important components include the following:

    • The service is in response to a community-defined need. This may mean placement at the service location (such as tutoring, serving needy populations, or mentoring youth), or project-based work (such as small business consulting, assistance with grant writing, or creation of advocacy materials).
    • The service should be integral to course learning goals, allowing for deeper understanding of the course content through experiential learning. Course credit is earned not by service alone, but by the learning process gained through service.  
    • Students critically reflect on their experience through some combination of written course assignments and discussion of the experience and how it relates to the coursework.
  • Sample community-based learning course syllabi
  • Transportation
    For logistical advice for all community-based learning courses, contact Kathleen Von Euw (kathleen.voneuw@manhattan.edu) or stop by the Social Action Suite in Kelly Commons for more information.
  • Tools & Resources

    Manhattan College Documents & Resources:

    Online Resources:

    Journals that Publish Articles relevant to Community-Based Learning: